PHP errors– what exactly they means


An error message that the PHP interpreter generates falls into one of five different categories:

* Parse error: A problem with the syntax of your program, such as leaving a semicolon off of the end of a statement. The interpreter stops running your program when it encounters a parse error.
* Fatal error: A severe problem with the content of your program, such as calling a function that hasn’t been defined. The interpreter stops running your program when it encounters a fatal error.
* Warning: An advisory from the interpreter that something is fishy in your program, but the interpreter can keep going. Using the wrong number of arguments when you call a function causes a warning.
* Notice: A tip from the PHP interpreter, playing the role of Miss Manners. For example, printing a variable without first initializing it to some value generates a notice.
* Strict notice: An admonishment from the PHP interpreter about your coding style. Most of these have to do with esoteric features that changed between PHP 4 and PHP 5, so you’re not likely to run into them too much.

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